Wiping over Headwear (Turbans, Caps, Khimaars) for Wudhoo’

In the Name of Allaah, the Most Gracious, the Ever Merciful…

I was asked about the issue of women wiping over their khimaars (head coverings) for wudhoo’. Seeking the Assistance of Allaah, I say:

The Messenger of Allaah (may Allaah raise his rank and grant him peace) wiped over his footwear and headwear, as found in Saheeh Muslim and other source books of hadeeth. Some scholars said this is not for women and their khimaars, however, to consider a ruling in Islaam specific to one of the two genders requires evidence, as all rulings in Islaam are for men and women alike, unless there is evidence to show an intended distinction.

All rulings in Islaam are for men and women alike, unless evidence establishes an intended distinction.

This is a very important principle in Fiqh. Furthermore, it has been reported from Umm Salamah (may Allaah be pleased with her), that she used to wipe over her khimaar for wudhoo’. This is the short version of the answer. Stop reading here, unless you are interested in a more detailed discussion.

Some scholars said it is not allowed for women to wipe over their khimaars. This is due to either

  • [A] Their rejection of the entire issue of wiping over headwear, because the evidence for it had not reached them,
  • [B] Or because they affirmed the Sunnah of wiping over headwear in general, but no report from a female Companion reached them affirming their practice of it, so did not see any basis for it in the practical understanding of the female Companions. There are in fact many reports of women Companions reaching under their khimaars to wipe over their heads for wudhoo’. However, those who knew of the reports (of Umm Salamah, for example) are given priority over those did not have them.

Those who affirm the permissibility of women wiping over the khimaar either

Benefits Related to Saying Aameen in Response to Jazaak Allaah khayran

In the Name of Allaah…

Dr. Muhammad Baazmool (may Allaah preserve him) mentioned that there is no specified answer from the Sunnah to Jazaak Allaahu Khayran, read here.

To add something to that: The phrase Jazaak Allaahu Khayran (may Allaah reward you well) is something that is from the Sunnah to be said to express thanks or praise, due to the hadeeth:

 مَنْ صُنِعَ إِلَيْهِ مَعْرُوفٌ فَقَالَ لِفَاعِلِهِ: جَزَاكَ اللَّهُ خَيْرًا. فَقَدْ أَبْلَغَ فِي الثَّنَاء.

On the authority of Usaamah Ibn Zayd, he said that the Messenger of Allaah (sallallaahu ‘alayhe wa sallam) said: “Whoever has had something nice done for him and then says to his companion, ‘Jazaak Allaahu Khayran,’ then he has surely excelled in praising (him).”

Al-Albaanee authenticated it in Saheeh Sunan At-Tirmithee #2035 (2/392).

So then it is not like other phrases found in the Sunnah that have specified answers, like:

1) Al-Hamdulillaah — Yarhamukallaah — Yahdeekumullaahu wa Yuslihu Baalakum

2) As-Salaamu ‘alaykum — wa ‘Alaykumus-Salaam

3) Uhibbuka fillaah — Ahabbak Continue reading

Hadeeth About Not Naming Children Ya’laa, Barakah, Aflah, Yasaar, and Naafi’

In the Name of Allaah, the Most Merciful, the Ever Merciful…

I was asked about the following hadeeth:

Jaabir ibn ‘Abdullaah reported that the Prophet (S) decided to forbid names like Ya’laa (elevated), Barakah (blessing), Aflah (successful), Yasaar (wealth) and Naafi’ (beneficial) (Reported by Muslim)

[1] Firstly, as an obligation, we say ( صلى الله عليه وسلم “sallallaahu ‘alayhe wa sallam” when mentioning our beloved Prophet, which may be expressed in English with the phrase: May Allaah raise his rank and grant him peace.  It is not permissible to change legislated phrases of thikr into abbreviations, like (S), (SAW), (PBUH), or the likes. Review the detailed verdicts of the scholars and further explanations here.

[2] Secondly, this prohibition has been collected by Imaam Muslim and others from two of the Companions, Samurah ibn Jundub and Jaabir ibn ‘Abdillaah, may Allaah be pleased with both of them. There are some slight differences in the wordings of their reports, and the wording mentioned in the question above seems to mix some of them together.

[A] Samurah’s wording is explicit, that he forbade four names: Aflah, Rabaah, Yasaar, and Continue reading