Wiping over Headwear (Turbans, Caps, Khimaars) for Wudhoo’

In the Name of Allaah, the Most Gracious, the Ever Merciful…

I was asked about the issue of women wiping over their khimaars (head coverings) for wudhoo’. Seeking the Assistance of Allaah, I say:

The Messenger of Allaah (may Allaah raise his rank and grant him peace) wiped over his footwear and headwear, as found in Saheeh Muslim and other source books of hadeeth. Some scholars said this is not for women and their khimaars, however, to consider a ruling in Islaam specific to one of the two genders requires evidence, as all rulings in Islaam are for men and women alike, unless there is evidence to show an intended distinction.

All rulings in Islaam are for men and women alike, unless evidence establishes an intended distinction.

This is a very important principle in Fiqh. Furthermore, it has been reported from Umm Salamah (may Allaah be pleased with her), that she used to wipe over her khimaar for wudhoo’. This is the short version of the answer. Stop reading here, unless you are interested in a more detailed discussion.

Some scholars said it is not allowed for women to wipe over their khimaars. This is due to either

  • [A] Their rejection of the entire issue of wiping over headwear, because the evidence for it had not reached them,
  • [B] Or because they affirmed the Sunnah of wiping over headwear in general, but no report from a female Companion reached them affirming their practice of it, so did not see any basis for it in the practical understanding of the female Companions. There are in fact many reports of women Companions reaching under their khimaars to wipe over their heads for wudhoo’. However, those who knew of the reports (of Umm Salamah, for example) are given priority over those did not have them.

Those who affirm the permissibility of women wiping over the khimaar either

Common Acts of Religious Excessiveness (Ghuluww) Regarding “Prayer Rugs”

In the Name of Allaah, the Most Gracious, the Ever Mercilful…

Allaah says, addressing the Jews and Christians with a stern admonition that Muslims are required to also heed and live by:

يا أهل الكتاب لا تغلوا في دينكم
“O people of the Book!  Do not go overboard in your religion!” [1]

His Messenger (may Allaah raise his rank and grant him peace) said:

إياكم والغلو فإنما أهلك من كان قبلكم الغلو
“Be warned against ghuluww (religious excessiveness), since that which destroyed the people who came before you was ghuluww!” [2]

To help fulfill this Prophetic order, this series of brotherly reminders highlights some everyday manifestations of religious excessiveness that Muslims may commonly fall into, so that we can be on guard against them and warn others of them.

Obsession with Prayer Mats, Rugs, and Carpets

The narrations found in Saheeh al-Bukhaaree and elsewhere, describing the Prophet (may Allaah raise his rank and grant him peace) praying on a khumrah [small mat] and a haseer [large mat] show the permissibility of praying on other than the bare ground. A few of the scholars held the opinion that the prayer may only be offered on the bare ground, so these narrations are a proof against their position. They do not provide a proof for the one who takes this action as part of his Religion, since the Companions did not take this as a religious matter. Rather, they understood it to be permissible, and thus prayed on mats, bedding, clothing, etc. whenever it made sense, for example: In the extreme heat to protect oneself from the heat of the ground.

Furthermore, the scholars have stated that it is better for a person to pray directly on the ground if he is able.  Shaykh al-Islaam Ibn Taymiyyah said:

The ahaadeeth and the aathaar (narrations from the Prophet, may Allaah raise his rank and grant him peace, and the Companions) show that they used to prefer placing their foreheads directly on the bare ground if they were able, and when necessary, like in extremely hot weather and the likes, they would pray with something between them and the ground, using something they had with them: a part of their clothing, turban, or cap… [3]

However, if someone still holds that these narrations prove the legislated nature of praying on what people today call “prayer rugs”, then we can look again to Shaykh al-Islaam Continue reading

Ibn Taymiyyah on Using Haraam Substances as Medical Treatments

In the Name of Allaah, the Most Gracious, the Ever Merciful…

MARIJUANA as a medical treatment?! REALLY?

Muslims, let us please go back to our scholars on such issues!

“Seeking medical cures from filthy (haraam) substances is proof of a sickness in the heart…”

What follows is a complete translation of a detailed answer given by Shaykh al-Islaam Ibn Taymiyyah [d.728] (may Allaah have Mercy on him) when he was asked about a patient whose doctors told him that the only (effective) medical treatment in his situation would be to consume intoxicants, canine (dog) meat, or even swine. He replied:

It is not permissible to use intoxicants and other filthy substances as medical treatments, based on what was reported by Waa’il ibn Hujr, [1] who said that Taariq ibn Suwayd al-Ju’fee [2] asked the Prophet (may Allaah raise his rank and grant him peace) about intoxicants, and he forbade him from using them. Taariq added, “But I only use them as medical treatments.” He (the Prophet) responded:

إنه ليس بدواء ولكنه داء
“It is not a treatment, however it is a disease (itself).” 

This (hadeeth) was collected by Imaams Ahmad and Muslim in his Saheeh. [3]

And on the authority of Aboo ad-Dardaa’, the Messenger of Allaah (may Allaah raise his rank and grant him peace) said:

إن الله أنزل الدواء وأنزل الداء وجعل لكل داء دواء، فتداووا ولا تتداووا بحرام
“Verily Allaah has sent down illnesses, and He has sent down the cures. He has made (available) a cure for every illness, so take medical treatments, but do not treat illnesses with haraam (substances).”

This (hadeeth) was collected by Aboo Daawood. [4]

And Aboo Hurayrah said Continue reading

Hadeeth Qudsee: “Neither My Earth nor My Heavens Could Contain Me…” [?]

In the Name of Allaah, the Most Merciful, the Ever-Merciful…

A hadeeth qudsee is a narration which is attributed to the Prophet (may Allaah raise his rank and grant him peace), that he narrated words from Allaah which are not part of the Quran. Unlike the Quran, these narrations have to be studied and authenticated before they can be accepted and acted upon.

One such narration commonly quoted and attributed to Allaah as His Words is as follows:

ما وسعني أرضي ولا سمائي، ووسعني قلب عبدي المؤمن…
“Neither My Earth nor My Heavens could contain Me, whilst the heart of My believing servant does contain Me…”

I found this hadeeth once while I was searching the manuscript archives at Umm al-Qura University. I came accross a title listed in one of the indexes on the topic of criticism of some unauthentic hadeeths in al-Bukhaaree and Muslim attributed to Ibn Taymiyyah. So I rushed to get the microfilm and print out a copy, thinking to have found some amazing treasure not known to even the scholars previously. When I began to read it, I found that it was actually a previously known work called “Ahaadeeth al-Qussaas (Hadeeths Used by Storytellers) by Ibn Taymiyyah, which has been printed already, and in fact it was even (for the most part) included in Ibn Taymiyyah’s large Fataawee Collection (18/122-128, 375-385).

What’s the connection? Well, the hadeeth qudsee in question is actually the first hadeeth mentioned in that book. About it, Ibn Taymiyyah said:

This is something they (storytellers) narrate from the Israa’eeliyyaat (narrations of the Jews and Christians). It has no known chain to the Prophet (may Allaah raise his rank and grant him peace). Its meaning would be (if it were authentic): His heart contains belief in Me, love of Me, and knowledge of Me.

Otherwise, anyone who would claim that Allaah Himself is present inside of the people’s hearts is more of a disbeliever than the Christians, who restricted that (Allaah’s actual presence within the creation) to the Messiah alone.

Other scholars of hadeeth, like al-‘Iraaqee, as-Sakhaawee, and Al-Albaanee Continue reading

The Reality of Ibn Sina (Avicenna), Famous Scientist and Philosopher

In the Name of Allaah, the Most Gracious, the Ever Merciful…

The famous fifth-century medical expert and philosopher, Ibn Sina, known to the West as “Avicenna”, is often credited as being one of the greatest Muslim scientists in history. His name is a celebrated one in many Muslim circles, and even hospitals and institutions of learning are named after him out of respect and admiration for his achievements.

While many Muslim scientists throughout history truly did pioneer many important medical and scientific breakthroughs, Muslims need to step back and re-examine what they have been led to believe about Ibn Sina specifically – Is it factually correct? Was he even a Muslim?

Shaykh al-Islaam Ibn Taymiyyah on Ibn Sina

Aboo ‘Alee Al-Husayn ibn ‘Abdillaah ibn al-Hasan ibn ‘Alee ibn Sina (d.428) was born to a severely deviant Ismaa’eelee (Shiite) family, known for their severe blasphemy and hypocrisy, as mentioned by Shaykh al-Islaam Ibn Taymiyyah.[1] In fact, as Ibn Taymiyyah said:

وأحسن ما يُظهرون دين الرفض وهم في الباطن يُبطنون الكفر المحض

“The best thing they showed openly was ar-Rafdh (being Raafhidah Shiites), while they concealed pure, absolute disbelief inwardly.” [1]

Ibn Taymiyyah confirmed this by mentioning that Ibn Sina himself identified his own family, his father, and his brother to all be from this severely deviant group that was exposed and declared outside of Islam by many scholars.

Ibn Taymiyyah further detailed how Ibn Sina attempted to blend what he learned from the deviant claimants to Islam, the Mu’tazliah and Raafidhah, with the polytheistic philosophy of Aristotle, and when he did so he deviated even further, Continue reading

Who is Considered a “Strong Believer”?

In the Name of Allaah, the All-Merciful…

Imaam Muslim [d.261] (may Allaah have Mercy on him) collected an amazing hadeeth in his Chapter on Qadr in his large collection of authentic narrations known as Saheeh Muslim.  The scholars refer to this hadeeth as “the Hadeeth of the Strong Believer.”

On the authority of Aboo Hurayrah (may Allaah be pleased with him), the Prophet (sallallaahu ‘alayhe wa sallam) said:

المُؤْمِنُ القَوِيُّ خَيْرٌ وَأَحَبُّ إِلَى اللهِ مِنَ المُؤْمِنِ الضَّعِيفِ، وَفِي كُلٍّ خَيْرٌ، احْرِصْ عَلَى مَا يَنْفَعُكَ، وَاسْتَعِنْ بِاللهِ، وَلَا تَعْجِزْ، وَإِنْ أَصَابَكَ شَيْءٌ فَلَا تَقُلْ: لَوْ أَنِّي فَعَلْتُ كَانَ كَذَا وَكَذَا لَمْ يُصِبْنِي كَذَا، وَلَكِنْ قُلْ: قَدَرُ اللهِ وَمَا شَاءَ فَعَلَ، فَإِنَّ لَوْ تَفْتَحُ عَمَلَ الشَّيْطَانِ

“The strong believer is better and more beloved to Allaah than the weak believer, while there is (still) goodness in both. Guard over that which benefits you, seek Allaah’s Assistance, Continue reading

Ibn Taymiyyah on Night Prayers in Ramadhan – 11 or 20 Rak’ahs?

 Shaykh al-Islaam Ibn Taymiyyah (may Allaah have Mercy on him) said:

“…The night prayers of Ramadhan have not been limited to a specific number (of rak’ahs).  He (the Prophet) himself (may Allaah raise his rank and grant him peace) used to pray no more than 13 rak’ahs in Ramadhan or any other time.  However, he used to pray with long rak’ahs. Continue reading